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Welcome to CCR

Biogeochemistry

CCR researchers are investigating global and regional biogeochemistry, with a particular focus on the carbon cycle of the land biosphere and of the oceans and Great Lakes. Using data and models, we elucidate natural carbon fluxes and the mechanisms controlling them, and work to use this information to improve predictive models.

Climate Impacts

We assess past and future climate change worldwide, including impacts on Arctic sea ice and clouds, the hydrologic cycle, atmospheric and oceanic circulation patterns, and weather extremes. One such project is the Wisconsin Initiative on Climate Change Impacts, in which high-resolution climate projections are being produced for Wisconsin, impacts on state resources are being evaluated, and adaptation strategies are being developed.

Land Surface Processes

In CCR, we study atmosphere-land interactions using models and data. We consider the connections of vegetation, soil moisture, snowpack, and topography to atmospheric processes. Responses of vegetation to climate change, including abrupt ecosystem change, and the influence of vegetation on climate are examined worldwide, including Wisconsin, Hawaii, Australia, and the Arctic.

Oceanography and Limnology

In CCR, we investigate the physics and biogeochemistry of the oceans and Great Lakes with data and models. Interactions between the oceans and atmosphere that generate and respond to multi-annual climate variability are a particular focus. Study of the Great Lakes focuses on carbon cycling, circulation, lake level variability and lake-effect snowfall.

Past Climates

CCR researchers are examining the impacts of variations in the Earth’s orbit, greenhouse gases, volcanic activity, and solar fluctuations on the Earth system over periods of centuries to millennia. Areas of investigation include the response of plant species, ecotones, ice sheets, megafauna, and fire regimes to both gradual and abrupt climate change over extended time durations, along with the impact on climate and the global carbon budget of early-human agricultural practices.